Posted in: literature
dhaak blog john milton

Dhaak: Breakfast with John Milton

John Milton was an English poet and intellectual who served as a civil servant for the Commonwealth of England under its Council of State and later under Oliver Cromwell. He wrote at a time of religious and political instability, and is best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost. […]

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Posted in: poetry
dhaak blog james shirley

Dhaak: James Shirley, the last of the Elizabethans

James Shirley (1596-1666) is one of the most significant dramatic writers of the late English Renaissance. He had an easy command of tragedy, comedy, tragicomedy, masque, pastoral, morality, and neo-miracle genres. His non-dramatic works include poems and grammars. […]

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Posted in: poetry
dhaak blog walt whitman

Dhaak: Walt Whitman, spedning a day with the master poet

Walt Whitman is America's world poet—a latter-day successor to Homer, Virgil, Dante, and Shakespeare. In Leaves of Grass (1855, 1891-2), he celebrated democracy, nature, love, and friendship. This monumental work chanted praises to the body as well as to the soul, and found beauty and reassurance even in death. […]

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Posted in: poetry
dhaak blog james leigh hunt

Dhaak: James Leigh Hunt, he introduced Shelley and Keats to the public by publishing their poems in the ‘Examiner’ in December 1816.

James Henry Leigh Hunt better known as Leigh Hunt was an English poet, essayist, journalist, editor, writer and critic, who remained a prominent figure of the Romantic Movement in England. He was editor of influential journals like 'The Reflector', and 'The Indicator', at a time when periodicals were culturally quite effective and on the roll. […]

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Posted in: literature
dhaak blog oliver goldsmith

Dhaak: Oliver Goldsmith, The Vicar of Wakefield

Goldsmith died after a brief illness in 1774, at the age of just 43, and is buried in London's Temple Church. Johnson would remember him as a man 'who left scarcely any kind of writing untouched and who touched nothing that he did not adorn'. […]

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Posted in: literature
dhaak blog sir walter scott

Dhaak: Sir Walter Scott, the poetic Unionist and a Tory

Scott was the most successful writer of his day. Not only did he sell more books, but he was the author most generally admired. He was a radical inventor of literary forms, and he turned the novel into an expressive medium for a variety of period, class, and regional experience. All British, American, and European novelists of the nineteenth century learned from his ways of writing. He was the great inventor in opera too. […]

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Posted in: poetry
dhaak blog alfred tennyson

Dhaak: Alfred, Lord Tennyson – "A state of transcendent wonder"

Born in 1809, Alfred Tennyson's poetic career spans much of the nineteenth century. Described as the 'great voice of Victorian England,' Tennyson became Poet Laureate in 1850. After his death in 1892, Tennyson left a literary legacy which includes many of the most popular nineteenth century poems. […]

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